Black Bass Diversity and Conservation: The Challenge Continues

Guest writer: Andrew Taylor Editor: Patrick Cooney I. The Species Question In a recent article, The Fisheries Blog asked the question: How many black bass (genus Micropterus) species are there? As it turned out, the article demonstrated that the answer is quite complicated. That previous post highlighted the nine species that the majority of black…

Fish of the People: Summit Lake Lahontan Cutthroat Trout

by Guest Author, Erin Loury Amid snow-capped peaks in a remote stretch of sagebrush-covered Nevada desert sits Summit Lake, a watery refuge for the stunning and threatened Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Thought to be the largest growing inland trout in North America, Lahontan Cutthroat can reach 50 inches and 40 pounds, though stories from mining boom…

Black Bass: How many species are there?

  Guest Author: Tim Bonvechio; Editor: Patrick Cooney Black bass are the most popular freshwater sportfish in the USA.  Their popularity as a sportfish has expanded their distribution from North America to around the world through human introductions.  While Largemouth Bass and Smallmouth Bass are arguably the most widely known and dispersed black bass species, there is…

Environmental Bullying: When Advocacates take on Science

An advocate knows the answer and looks for evidence to support it; a scientist asks nature how much support there is for competing hypotheses. -Ray Hilborn In recent months, environmental advocacy groups have been making news in fisheries science. In the spring, Dr. Molly Lutcavage outlined her history with Carl Safina and his bluefin tuna agenda….

What can guppies teach us about fisheries management?

We can’t manipulate entire stocks of Bluefin Tuna in massive experiments. But we can use guppies to get the same answer. But first, a quiz: How does overfishing affect fish populations? Obviously, more commercial catch reduces the total biomass and number of individuals in a stock—that’s a given. But commercial over-harvest has another, more subtle…

Biologists cut the faces off of fish to save streams (VIDEO)

By Patrick Cooney, Certified Fisheries Professional Scientists at hatcheries are cutting the faces off of fish as part of a program to improve the health of rivers, but why?  Read on, and you will realize that this rather barbaric act makes scientific sense. Video by Patrick Cooney What do gardens and rivers have in common?…

Q-n-A: CO2 Barriers to Fish Movement

A few weeks ago we covered the topic of using CO2 as a barrier to fish movement. For a refresher, you can read about it here, but the basic idea is that some river locks may be infused with CO2, creating a plume of CO2 water that is released when the lock is open and…

Unlikely invaders

by Brandon Peoples The media likes to make a big deal about invasive species. We’ve seen plenty videos of jumping carp, documentaries about Red Lionfish, and photos of pipes choked by zebra muzzels. But what about the other aquatic invaders, the ones that sometimes sneak past the headlines…the species that may even be threatened in their…

Some Unexpected Consequences of Climate Change

By: Troy Farmer, a postdoctoral researcher at Auburn University On a global scale, aquatic systems are warming. Average temperatures in the world’s oceans have been steadily increasing over the past 50 years. Given that the observed warming trends are predicted to continue, our job, as fisheries scientists, is to understand how fish are presently being…