Repeat spawner series: “Winter: the forgotten study season”

At the Fisheries Blog, we’re starting a new series of posts, once a month, where we bring back “oldie but goodie” posts from our now extensive archive. Rest assured, these “repeat spawner” posts, smell a whole lot better than that leftover fish you found in the fridge from two weeks ago!

Choosing the right graduate program

by Bryan Bozeman, guest author I emailed at least 100 professors in my hunt for a grad position…and received less than 20 responses. Half of those were out-of-office emails, several others were ‘thanks-but-no-thanks’, and a few showed actual interest. I was fortunate to have three opportunities, and ended up selecting one that has been an…

Moms: The True Livebearers of Fisheries Research

We share photos and stories of women who conduct research while simultaneously creating and sustaining brand new human beings. We highlight some of these inspiring scientists to demonstrate that not only is Mom-ing in Science doable, but it is also fun and rewarding!

Gila Trout: A Native Trout Conservation Story

Plip. That’s the sound of a barbless beadhead nymph falling into a glassy glide of Mineral Creek, a headwater stream of the Gila River in southwest New Mexico.  There’s a short drift over a stony run, barely time to mend your line. Then follows that transmutation of fish flesh to your forearm—the taut tug of…

Clearly, the coolest fish in the sea

With its clear head and large green eyes, the Barreleye looks like an alien with a glass bulb on its head out of a sci-fi film…why does a fish need a transparent head?

How one scientist transformed scientific art

Art and science aren’t that different. Both require a deep level of curiosity, an experimental process, patience, and a high tolerance for failure. For me it just makes sense to blend the two, it’s a win-win.

Stalking the Elusive Shoal Bass

Guest Author: Amy Cottrell Editor: Solomon David The sun began creeping up over the tree tops and casting morning shadows and specks of daylight on the water surface, slowly lighting up more and more of the heavily vegetated creek bank. We paddled the quiet corridor, antenna rotating side to side in front of me as…

The New Rules of Science Communication

If these rules are followed, your impact will grow, interest in your work will increase and so will your network of like-minded people. Fishery Scientists can take on this responsibility and run with it, and the time is now.

Facts and Fallacies: A Columbus/Indigenous Day Fish Story

We take a look at a very particular occurrence on one of Columbus’ return trips to the Western Hemisphere where he encountered indigenous people using, perhaps, one of the most interesting methods ever employed to catch fish.