Frog Eat Frog World

With Guest Blogger Ben Ikenson, explore how the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partners are managing the ‘menace of bullfrogs’ to protect habitats for threatened and endangered native fish and frogs…

Repeat spawner series: Fun Fish Festivals

Though celebrations and typical summer activities, such as outdoor festivals, may look different this year, we hope you enjoy this “repeat spawner” post – a virtual visit to some fun fish festivals…

Inland fisheries are a key ingredient to reaching Sustainable Development Goals

Though they are not explicitly mentioned, inland fisheries make substantial contributions towards achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, particularly No Poverty (SDG 1), Zero Hunger (SDG 2), Clean Water and Sanitation (SDG 6), Responsible Consumption and Production (SDG 12) and Life on Land (SDG 15).

Who is Louella Cable?

Guest blogger Ben Ikenson illuminates a piece of fisheries professional trivia and an important life’s work…

The Human Side of the Shark Fin Trade

The common narrative of the shark fin trade only tells the sharks’ side of the story. Here, guest blogger Kylie Holub discusses the human side of the shark fin trade…

Feelin’ Hot Hot Hot!

The Mojave Desert is hot, expansive, and intimidating; but the region is dotted with small pools that some pretty cool fish call home…

Repeat spawner series: “Winter: the forgotten study season”

At the Fisheries Blog, we’re starting a new series of posts, once a month, where we bring back “oldie but goodie” posts from our now extensive archive. Rest assured, these “repeat spawner” posts, smell a whole lot better than that leftover fish you found in the fridge from two weeks ago!

Take a seat at the (policy) table

While there are many “ingredients” in the “sausage making” that we call policy making, science can play an important role in informing those processes…

Good addition? Or bad invader? Chinook Salmon in South America

Throughout North America, ongoing resource management and restoration projects aim to conserve Chinook Salmon because their populations have been threatened by many ecological factors, including habitat change, high harvest rates, and hatchery influence. In contrast, these fish are known as an invasive species in the Southern Hemisphere, having been introduced (and continuing to spread) to rivers of the Patagonia and Magellan regions of Chile and Argentina…

Connecting fish, rivers, and people

Like a clogged artery in you or me can cause a heart attack or stroke, a blockage in a river can have significant ecological, social, and economic consequences.  These systems function best without barriers…