Repeat spawner series: “Winter: the forgotten study season”

At the Fisheries Blog, we’re starting a new series of posts, once a month, where we bring back “oldie but goodie” posts from our now extensive archive. Rest assured, these “repeat spawner” posts, smell a whole lot better than that leftover fish you found in the fridge from two weeks ago!

Take a seat at the (policy) table

While there are many “ingredients” in the “sausage making” that we call policy making, science can play an important role in informing those processes…

Good addition? Or bad invader? Chinook Salmon in South America

Throughout North America, ongoing resource management and restoration projects aim to conserve Chinook Salmon because their populations have been threatened by many ecological factors, including habitat change, high harvest rates, and hatchery influence. In contrast, these fish are known as an invasive species in the Southern Hemisphere, having been introduced (and continuing to spread) to rivers of the Patagonia and Magellan regions of Chile and Argentina…

Connecting fish, rivers, and people

Like a clogged artery in you or me can cause a heart attack or stroke, a blockage in a river can have significant ecological, social, and economic consequences.  These systems function best without barriers…

Clearly, the coolest fish in the sea

With its clear head and large green eyes, the Barreleye looks like an alien with a glass bulb on its head out of a sci-fi film…why does a fish need a transparent head?

How to “attend” a professional meeting without attending

There are many reasons, financial, personal, professional, which inhibit us from attending every relevant conference and meeting in person. While other means of communication and engagement will surely never replace the experience of being present at a conference, we do now often have alternative means to participate in some capacity…

What is our fisheries research impact?

The daily work of fishery managers can have very tangible impact on the resources…research can be a bit more removed but can still have a significant impact with engagement of appropriate audiences.