Fish Health Surveys Inform Conservation

Guest Author: Craig Springer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service I’m standing in a small side room at Willow Beach National Fish Hatchery, just off a larger chamber where a dozen concrete raceways lie. Double-doored olive metal cabinets stand against white walls under effusive florescent light. Well-used grease boards smudged with eraser marks under blue-ink to-do…

New Year: “No,” You

“It will look great on your CV!” I think any graduate student or postdoc has heard this before…usually after a mentor or supervisor has asked for you to do some sort of activity without any (or much compensation). In reality, it sounds fairly innocent; after all, as a budding academic, a lengthy and diverse CV…

Peer-review Survey Results!

About 2 months ago I asked all those willing and interested to participate in a survey about peer-review. As a refresher, peer-review is that activity that many of us undertake a few times per year where we anonymously evaluate the work of our peers. This typically happens in the setting of an author or collection…

Peer Review Survey

Although this topic will not appeal to everyone, many of us in fisheries science participate in peer review—the process of technically reviewing the manuscripts of other fisheries scientists. This is a critical process for any science—we can only publish what is generally accepted and vetting, but it also takes substantial work. In order to understand…

Environmental Bullying: When Advocacates take on Science

An advocate knows the answer and looks for evidence to support it; a scientist asks nature how much support there is for competing hypotheses. -Ray Hilborn In recent months, environmental advocacy groups have been making news in fisheries science. In the spring, Dr. Molly Lutcavage outlined her history with Carl Safina and his bluefin tuna agenda….

Neighborhood watch: rising threats to freshwater fishes

 By Stephanie Januchowski-Hartley, Guest Blogger Illustrations by Hannah Dean Imagine you live in a small neighborhood with limited places to access food or resources. What if, in addition to living in a small neighborhood, 30% of your neighborhood were also under an activity that impacts you in a negative way? Say it is under construction and you can’t…

What do you want from a professional society?

Many of us that work in fisheries science—and in other sciences—participate in a professional society. These are groups that aren’t based with your employer, but rather are comprised of individuals across a number of jobs and sectors. Professional scientific societies provide excellent means for networking, sharing science, and many other benefits. Common examples of professional…

Nemo isn’t the only transgender fish in the sea

By Lindsay Glass Campbell, Guest Blogger Out to burst the bubble of Disney enthusiasts everywhere comes the revelation that Flounder of the Little Mermaid might have been an XX-male fish.  It’s not just Nemo who is deceiving you!  Then again, the fish named Flounder in the cartoon has no real resemblance to an actual flounder…

Dam Removals

Recently we’ve heard a lot of trumped up talk about building walls. While we don’t get political here at The Fisheries Blog, we wanted to take this opportunity to highlight the trend of taking down walls, also known as dam removal. Dams are built for a lot of good reasons. Larger ones produce hydropower, and…

The Trout You’ve Never Heard Of (and Almost Never Did)

By Craig Springer, Guest Blogger The trout stole its color from a southern New Mexico summer sunset. Gila trout sport a painter’s pallet of pink and olive, rose, yellow, copper—and a few tones in between. Beneath the black pepper flakes that fleck its side lies a lexis—a language carried forward from another time. It’s an…

Q-n-A: CO2 Barriers to Fish Movement

A few weeks ago we covered the topic of using CO2 as a barrier to fish movement. For a refresher, you can read about it here, but the basic idea is that some river locks may be infused with CO2, creating a plume of CO2 water that is released when the lock is open and…

Why didn’t the fish cross under the road?

Think about how you arrived to work or school today, yesterday, or last week. Did you go by car, bike, or train? Did your journey include traveling over a river, wetland, stream, or estuary? If you answered yes to either of these questions, it is very likely that you crossed over a possible barrier to fish…

I’ll have the jellyfish…

“I’ll have the jellyfish!” might be a phrase heard more often as this seafood item gains popularity with chefs and takes a place on more menus.  As we fish throughout the food web, eco-minded consumers are looking for and demanding options that are more sustainable and are mindful of varying impacts of the fisheries on…

CO2 Fish Barriers

Asian carp are here in the US to stay. This group of fishes are often called Bigheaded carps, and typically includes silver carp, bighead carp, grass carp, and black carp. Each species was brought to the US from Asia for different reasons—for example, grass carp were introduced for weed control as they eat vegetation.  Each…

Conservation Road Maps for The Coming Decade

By Michelle Staudinger Every 10 years, State natural resource agencies review the health (or decline) of their fish, wildlife, and associated habitats. They take a proactive approach, thinking carefully about the priorities, challenges, and actions they would like to accomplish during the coming decade. All of this planning and reflection is packaged into each State’s…